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Earlier
Russell Clarke writes: In December 1962 Gustav Metzger gave a lecture at Ealing Technical College & School of Art, now part of the University of West London, entitled Auto Destructive Art, Auto Creative Art: The Struggle for the Machine Arts of the Future. It clearly inspired all who heard it, including Pete Townshend, then a graphic arts student at the college.Shortly afterwards in a nearby pub, he watched as the double bass player Malcolm Cecil sawed his instrument in half while still attempting to play it, as his piano player, Andy “Thunderclap” Newman, played bizarre arrangements of jazz classics. (In 1969 Townshend produced Newman's No 1 hit Something in the Air.) It surely cannot be a coincidence that once Townshend got the Who up and running, he specialised in his own form of auto-destructive art – smashing his (usually expensive) guitar to pieces at the end of the show. Continue reading... [...]
Sun, Mar 26, 2017
Source: The Guardian
John Lewin canvases from about 1800 pre-date his still-life of fish hanging in Adelaide galleryA pair of Australian oil paintings believed to be the first in the country have been discovered at the Royal College of Surgeons in London.The two canvases, showing groups of amiable kangaroos sitting in a leafy landscape, were unearthed by an academic in the collection of the Hunterian Museum at the RCS. Continue reading... [...]
Sun, Mar 26, 2017
Source: The Guardian
Chairman of Chase Manhattan bank and one of the US's leading philanthropistsDavid Rockefeller, who has died aged 101, was the patriarch of the Rockefeller family and the last of the grandchildren of John D Rockefeller, who founded Standard Oil and as the US's first billionaire was at one point considered the world's richest man.Unlike his brothers Nelson, vice-president of the US and governor of New York, or Winthrop, governor of Arkansas, David never sought public office; indeed he even turned down Nelson's offer to appoint him to fill Robert Kennedy's Senate seat after Kennedy was assassinated. Continue reading... [...]
Sun, Mar 26, 2017
Source: The Guardian
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is marking the first anniversary of its heralded refurbishment in style, with a performance by the pop songstress Solange Knowles and the inauguration of new works by Judy Chicago and Clare Rojas. The Birthday Bash benefit, scheduled to take place 26 April, will unfold in two concurrent parties, says a statement: the Birthday Supper, a seated dinner in the museums fifth-floor Jean and James Douglas Family Sculpture Garden and the Surprise Bash, an interactive art experience in the museums seventh-floor galleries. Chicagos Be No More installation, which will be on show at the museums Howard Street entrance, is a new iteration of the dry-ice environments that the feminist artist began making in 1967. Rojas will unveil a series of wall works at the Surprise Bash made in collaboration with the artist Barry McGee, featuring lyrics by Rojas's alter ego, the musician Peggy Honeywell. Artist Alex Israel will be inking guests with limited edition permanent tattoos, while Solange will crown the evening with a performance in the museums Haas Jr. atrium. [...]
Sun, Mar 26, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
National Portrait Gallery, LondonThis show of portraits – or are they? – by the late painter is as noisy as it is contemplative. And, always, a dancing blaze of colourThe National Portrait Gallery's new Howard Hodgkin show borrows its title from Absent Friends, a picture (2000-1) in which broad strokes of black and brown gradually shade into stripes of muddy, fleshy white and then, finally, into a band of the artist's favourite turquoise. To my eyes, this painting is not a portrait. Rather, it is an expression of what it means to miss someone: a visual ache in which longing is delicately balanced against the hope of return, the turquoise bringing to mind a summer sea as glimpsed from a far-off hill. Nevertheless, it's hard to think of a more appropriate work with which to open an exhibition of what the gallery is quite determined to call portraits. Hodgkin died on 9 March at the age of 84, for which reason the exhibition, just like Absent Friends, is black-bordered, his loss running through the mind on a loop. But as you wander round, something else bubbles away too: an insistent, green-blue optimism. This, you come to realise, is hello again, not goodbye. Continue reading... [...]
Sun, Mar 26, 2017
Source: The Guardian
When the artist Yoko Ono made the film Bottoms in 1967, officials at the Royal Albert Hall in London refused to show the 80-minute piece which consists of nothing but close-up shots of 365 bums. According to the UK newspaper, the i, Marion Herrod, the venue secretary, was enflamed by the proposal, saying: We are concerned with the protection of the hall and I was not convinced that we should not have disruptive behaviour from way-out elements. The film was shot in a London residence after Ono advertised for participants in a niche newspaper. Ono tweeted: Im very pleased my film Bottoms is finally being shown at The Royal Albert Hall, 50 years after it was banned. The rear-filled footage is due to be screened on 3 May as part of the Summer of Love: Revisited season. [...]
Sat, Mar 25, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
Benno Tempel, the director of the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, has a prized photograph fixed to the back of his computer monitor – Barack Obama standing in front of one of the museum's most important paintings: Piet Mondrian's Victory Boogie Woogie (1942–44). In 2014, The Hague hosted the Nuclear Security Summit and the final press conference took place in the museum's courtyard, which had been speedily covered over with a permanent glass roof for the event. I am meeting Tempel in mid January, the day before the inauguration of the 45th president, and am curious about Obama's visit. His speech was longer than expected, Tempel says, and his entourage ‘was pulling at his arm when he finished and came off stage'. The president, however, insisted that he wanted to see the painting and when he walked into the gallery said, ‘Ah, the fabulous one!' When Tempel's predecessor at the Gemeentemuseum acquired Victory Boogie Woogie in 1998, from S.I. Newhouse, president of Condé Nast, for $40 million, it was the most expensive painting a Dutch museum had ever bought. Since the Dutch national bank had donated the sum for the purchase to the Dutch National Art Foundation, it was a state-funded acquisition, which some observers – and the body that scrutinises government spending – thought inappropriate. The chief curator of the Rembrandt House said at the time, ‘We could have acquired at least two good Rembrandts for that price.' But for the Gemeentemuseum, which already held the largest collection of Mondrians in the world, it was an essential acquisition. Victory Boogie Woogie is the only painting by Mondrian from the 1940s in a Dutch museum and it will be the centrepiece of this summer's ‘The Discovery of Mondrian' exhibition (3 June–24 September), for which every single one of the Gemeentemuseum's more than 300 works [...]
Sat, Mar 25, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
I'm PAD, the Paris art and design fair (until 26 March), has lost its vetting committee, the panel of experts that screens all the works offered by dealers, with a right to veto any objects they find to be questionable. Soon after the opening of the fairs 20th anniversary edition on Wednesday, the Compagnie Nationale des Experts (CNE), which was in charge of PADs vetting, decided to withdraw. The circumstances were such [that we] could no longer perform a proper job, its chairman Frdric Castaing told The Art Newspaper. It was a difficult decision, but one we took unanimously; our trade has a professional and ethical position to stand for. All those who volunteered for the mission thought they were being treated disrespectfully, Castaing added. The time given to screen the objects before the opening has been dramatically reduced, even though experts had doubts about certain objects. Some booths could not be controlled at all. So we thought it was better to stop than take on responsibility for something over which we had no control. Although Castaing said that some works at this years fair appeared to be problematic, he declined to give specifics. This situation is not new, he added. Over the years, the material conditions have deteriorated. We decided to stop vetting PAD London before the last edition for the same reasons. Apparently, tensions erupted when the fairs organisers excluded two experts from the vetting committee, for motives that have nothing to do with professional and ethical standards according to CNE. Founded in 1997 by Patrick Perrin, the son of one of the most prestigious antiques dealers in Paris, PAD is held in the Tuileries Gardens, near the Louvre. It features some 67 exhibitors presenting a mix of design, sculpture, jewellery, tribal and modern [...]
Fri, Mar 24, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
The unsung heroes of art are its facilitators – those founders, engineers, printers and the like without whose technical prowess and ingenuity the works of others could not be realised, or at least, not with such bravura. On 18 April, Phillips New York turns the spotlight on a remarkable family of master printers: the brothers Milan, Aldo and Piero Crommelynck. They had been sent to Paris to learn intaglio printing by their Belgian playwright father who had always regretted never being good with his hands. Fernand Crommelynck had intended his sons to become artists; instead they chose to bring to fruition the printed oeuvres of the giants of 20th-century art. Le Californie (Intérieur rouge) (1959–60), after Pablo Picasso. Estimate: $6,000–8,000. Image courtesy of Phillips / Phillips.com The 100 or so prints on offer here were part of the cache of material left by Piero Crommelynck, who died in 2001. It is in one sense a motley assortment – there is everything from preparatory drawings to annotated and progressive state working proofs, not necessarily complete – but it offers a fascinating glimpse into the often surprisingly complex processes of printmaking. While there are etchings and aquatints by everyone from Braque to Le Corbusier, Jasper Johns, Jim Dine and David Hockney, and intriguing Joan Miró preparatory drawings and working proofs with hand-colouring and printing notes by the artist, it is Picasso who dominates. This is hardly surprising. The Crommelyncks were responsible for almost half of the master's intaglio images, a large portion of his entire graphic output. They even followed him down to Mougins in the South of France, setting up a makeshift studio in a former bakery to be close at hand. Nature morte au citron et pichet rouge (Still Life with Lemon and Red Pitcher) (1964), after Pablo Picasso. Estimate: $6,000–8,000. Image courtesy [...]
Fri, Mar 24, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
The veteran Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya has created a site-specific work made of mist as the centrepiece of BMW Tate Live Exhibition: Ten Days Six Nights (24 March-2 April)the Tate Moderns first ever live exhibition, says the museum director Frances Morris. Nakayas worktitled London Fog (2017) and made in collaboration with Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takataniis on show outside the museums new Switch House building. The exhibition brings together old friends with new friends, Morris says. Nakaya, who has lifetime of collaboration behind herincluding with the US artist Robert Rauschenberg whose major survey is also on show at the museumwas the starting point for the exhibition, which combines performances, film, installations, music and dance. There will be a continuously changing programme throughout the duration of the exhibition, says the shows co-curator Catherine Wood. The exhibition, which is primarily housed in the museums subterranean Tanks galleries, is the first in a series of annual live exhibitions that will take place over the next four years, Woods says. The exhibition includes works by around 20 artists, ranging from a rave dance music piece by the Italian artist and musician Lorenzo Senni to an immersive installation filled with plants by the Dominican artist Isabel Lewis, which will host several events including Angolan kizomba dancing, discussions and food and drink experiences. There are also interactive works by the US artists Wu Tsang and Fred Molten, and CAMP, a collaborative studio group from Mumbai. One-off live screenings and performances will also take place, including a piece by the Berlin-based choreographer and dancer Ligia Lewis in the Tanks as well as a dance performance by Min Tanaka within Nakayas mist and soundscape installation outside. Although Tate Modern has hosted live performances beforeand for two days in 2015 the French choreographer Boris Charmatz turned [...]
Fri, Mar 24, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper

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