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Today
The Marciano Art Foundation in Los Angeles, a private museum run by the founders of Guess Jeans, the brothers Paul and Maurice Marciano, opens to the public today, 25 May. The museum is housed in a former Masonic temple that was retrofitted by the New York architecture firm wHY. It includes around around 55,000 sq. ft of exhibition space, which will be used primarily to present the Marcianos collection of around 1,500 works by 200 artists. The museum opens with two inaugural shows. One, titled Unpacking, is a presentation of around 100 works by artists like El Anatsui, Trisha Donnelly, Charles Ray and Christopher Wool; the other show, Jim Shaw: the Wig Museum, is a 30-year survey of the artist's work that includes a site-specific installation in the building's former 13,600 sq. ft theatre. The museum is the latest addition to a growing number of private institutions run by wealthy collectors. In 2015, the Broad museum, run by Eli and Edythe Broad, opened in Los Angeles. The Marciano Foundation will be open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays to the public (Wednesdays are dedicated to school groups) and offers free admission, but timed tickets must be reserved online. Tickets are currently sold out through June. [...]
Thu, May 25, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
Series of shows across country from next year will feature works by some of world's best-loved artists Related: Queer British Art review 1861-1967 – strange, sexy, heartwrenching | Adrian Searle Works by Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Pablo Picasso, Virginia Woolf and Edward Burne-Jones will feature in a series of exhibitions at the Tate from next year. The artists join a portfolio of names, from the pre-Raphaelite painters to modern film and performance artists, that will feature in shows across the country's galleries. Continue reading... [...]
Thu, May 25, 2017
Source: The Guardian
The Tate has announced its 2018 exhibition programme for its four venues, with two of the three major solo exhibitions at Tate Modern going to female artists, continuing the museums wider trend of showing more female artists. Solo shows of the US video and performance artist Joan Jonas (14 March-5 August 2018) and the textile pioneer and Bauhaus artist Anni Albers (11 October 201813 January 2019) will follow an exhibition of work by Picasso that he made in a single year, Picasso 1932 Love, Fame, Tragedy (8 March9 September 2018). Tate Britain will host two major group shows, All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century Of Painting (28 February-27 August 2018) and Aftermath: Art in the Wake of WWI (5 June-16 September 2018). All Too Human will focus on post-war figurative painting in Britain, and include works by Francis Bacon, Frank Auerbach, R.B. Kitaj and Paula Rego. Aftermath will mark the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, and will look a the immediate impact of European art and the development of avant-garde movements such as Dada and Surrealism. Tate St Ives, which reopened this year following a major expansion, has planned a show of 35 female artists grouped around the theme of Virginia Woolfs writing (January-May 2018) and an exhibition of work by the British artists Patrick Heron (May-September 2018), who lived near to St Ives until his death in 1999. Tate Liverpool will celebrate its 30th birthday with an exhibition of the Austrian artist Egon Schiele (24 May-23 September 2018), including rarely seen drawings, and the French artist Fernand Lger (23 November 2018-17 March 2019), as well as the first major UK show of the leading Iraqi abstract painter Dia Al-Azzawi. [...]
Thu, May 25, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
Jane da Mosto, a leader of the activist generation of Venetians who have refused to stand by and let their city die, has at last received official recognition from the town council. She has been awarded the Osella dOro prize (called after the gold coin that the doges used to give to the senators). It will be presented on 27 May by Mayor Luigi Brugnaro on the feast of the Sensa, when the ancient ceremony of the marriage between Venice and the Adriatic is re-enacted. The citation praises her for her constant and personal dedication to the cultural life of the city, the safeguarding of its delicate human and social fabric, the lagoon and its extraordinary townscape on water, and her involvement with the Venice in Peril Fund and We are Here, Venice, the citizens action group that she helped found. This is a major change from the contempt in which citizens action groups have been held hitherto, for which Unesco criticised the authorities in its 2015 report on the state of the Venice. [...]
Thu, May 25, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
Photographer Sarah Lee takes a free and abstract brief and concentrates her candid eye on the people, the colour and the tone of the horticultural spectacular, showing the RHS show isn't just about flowers Continue reading... [...]
Thu, May 25, 2017
Source: The Guardian
The French conceptual artist Bernar Venet is making a splash in the UK this summer, with his first gallery show in London in more than 40 years; an exhibition of large-scale sculptures at Cliveden country house in Buckinghamshire; and a new work on show in Frieze Sculpture in Regents Park, London. The artist rose to prominence in the 1960s when he began making work based on mathematical and scientific formulae. Bernar Venet: Looking Forward 1961-84, which opens at Londons Blain Southern next month (8 June-22 July), focuses on his early innovations, from industrial paint works such as Dchet (1961) to key installations such as Tas de Charbon (Pile of Coal, 1963). Venet moved to New York in 1966, subsequently creating works such as Stock Market TV Piece (1970) and How To Pick a Fund (1969), which reflect his continued fascination with mathematical theory, equations, finance and data. Sculptural works from Venets ongoing Indeterminate Line series dating from the 1970s and 1980s will also go on show. Meanwhile, an exhibition of ten large-scale sculptures by Venet opened earlier this month (until 15 October) in the grounds of Cliveden, the estate created for the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland in the 1850s. The swooping russet works, crafted from Corten Steel, are variations on the Arcs and Indeterminate Lines. A new piece, Seven Leaning Straight Lines, has been installed beneath Cliveden's clock tower. All of the works are for sale; Blain Southern has organised the display in collaboration with the National Trust, which owns the property. Venet says in a statement: My sculptures have been exhibited throughout the world, and every latitude has its peculiarities and qualities, but I am very enthusiastic about the way they integrate into the English countryside. They have found their place here. The [...]
Thu, May 25, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
For Sgt Pepper's 50th anniversary, the great psychedelic visionary of feminist art has created a giant mop-top mural inspired by Fixing a Hole – a song that sums up what she has spent her entire career doingWhen American artist Judy Chicago accepted an invitation earlier this year from the Tate to paint a large-scale public mural as part of Liverpool's Sgt Pepper at 50 celebration of the Beatles' most popular album, she was amused to hear of an exchange between two of the curators involved in the project. One of them said, “What is Judy going to do? Paint a giant vagina?” The other replied, “I hope so.” Related: The Beatles: Sgt Pepper 50th Anniversary Edition review – peace, love and rock star ennui Related: Beatlemania in 1964: 'This has gotten entirely out of control' Continue reading... [...]
Thu, May 25, 2017
Source: The Guardian
Earlier
‘I wanted to show well-off people the underclass – where they lived, how they lived, what they did'In 1952, I came back to New York after studying in Chicago, keen to break new ground. I decided to use colour to document what people were doing, even though colour was not what museums wanted. The other problem was that colour film was so slow. You needed fast lenses and enough sunlight. Still, I felt that I could not only succeed, but do better than what had gone before.The first shots I took were at the Italian festival in downtown New York. The second were at Coney Island in winter. That's when this was taken. In the summer, Coney Island was like Brighton in England. We didn't have air-conditioning back then – you'd have thousands of people on the beach, because it was the only way to get out of the heat of the city. There were still remnants of the early 1900s: beer gardens, silent movies, carousels. Related: New York's faded playground: can Coney Island recapture lost glories? Continue reading... [...]
Wed, May 24, 2017
Source: The Guardian
Our daily round-up of news from the art world Paris's Musée Dapper to close | The Musée de la Fondation Dapper in Paris's 16th arrondissement is to close its doors next month, citing high maintenance costs and low attendance figures, reports Le Figaro (French language article). The museum was opened by the Dapper Foundation in 1986 as a space for exhibitions of African and Caribbean art. In a statement, director Christiane Falgayrettes-Leveau said that the closure and sale of the premises would allow the foundation to pursue its international cultural activities and invest in other spaces. Dana Lixenberg wins Deutsche Börse photography prize | Dutch photographer Dana Lixenberg has been awarded the prestigious Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize for a series of portraits she took of residents of the Imperial Courts social housing project in Los Angeles. Lixenberg began the project in the wake of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, and has revisited the site frequently over the intervening decades, publishing a book of photographs in 2015. Lixenberg wins £30,000 in recognition of her achievement. Phillips's Matt Carey-Williams to join Blain Southern | Matt Carey-Williams, Phillips's deputy chairman for Europe and Asia, is to take up a directorship at private gallery Blain Southern in September, reports the Art Newspaper. The move marks a return to the gallery world for Carey-Williams, who joined the auction house from White Cube in 2015. Lord Browne of Madingley appointed Courtauld Institute chairman | The Courtauld Institute of Art has announced that businessman and philanthropist Lord Browne of Madingley is to take up up its chair as of September. Browne has previously served as a trustee of the British Museum and since 2007 has been chairman of trustees at the Tate, a post from which he is to step down this summer. Recommended reading | Artist and writer Alex Melamid [...]
Mon, May 22, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
The star item of this summer's ‘Gilded Interiors' exhibition at London's Wallace Collection is the spectacular mantel clock shown in its own space at the entrance to this small but beautifully designed installation. It was commissioned in 1771 by the council of the city of Avignon as a gift for the Marquis de Rochechouart, who had won back that city for France from the papacy. The order was given to Ange Aubert, an Avignon-born jeweller established in Paris and the sculptor Louis-Simon Boizot prepared a terracotta model for approval by the Avignon council. The resulting design combines classical references with secular detail. The presiding tutelary female deity with her mural crown represents the city of Avignon who places a wreath of oak on the Rochechouart coat of arms above the clock dial. Below the dial, male and female river gods represent the Rhone and its tributary the Durance, the rivers which bring prosperity to Avignon. The Avignon Clock (1771), designed by Louis-Simon Boizot; case made by Pierre Gouthière. Wallace Collection, London Boizot had recently returned from five years' study at the French Academy in Rome. The figures modelled for this sophisticated clock case were inspired by his knowledge of classical and baroque sculpture in the Eternal City. They range from the classical Vatican statue of the river god Nile to Bernini's celebrated Four Rivers fountain, representing the Nile, the Danube, the Ganges, and the Plate in the Piazza Navona. The model was probably cast under the supervision of Pierre Gouthière, whose astonishing skill as a ciseleur-doreur has achieved renewed celebrity through the exhibition recently at the Frick and now at the Musée des Arts Decoratifs, Paris. The gleaming skin of the river gods contrasts with skilfully chased details; the horn of plenty is filled with pomegranates and vines; flowing water with floating branches of [...]
Mon, May 22, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine

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