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The great America unfurls his flags, targets, maps and beer cans, an old master called Big Tom reveals some weird geometry, and the Turner prize hits Hull – all in your weekly dispatchJasper Johns The intellect and emotion of the objects and paintings, prints and assemblages of this exquisite artist put him at the centre of the art of our time. Flags, targets, maps and beer cans – Johns has done them all with unequalled wit. He managed to invent pop art, conceptual art and minimalism all in one go when he started to make an American flag out of waxy paint layered over newspaper collage in 1954 and has been meditating with the same serious irony about objects and their meanings ever since. • Royal Academy, London, from 23 September to 10 December. Continue reading... [...]
Fri, Sep 22, 2017
Source: The Guardian
Taken from a series shot between 1965 to 1968, this photograph illustrates the artist's ability to capture the idiosyncrasies of life in the USRacked up and positioned in rows that disappear along sharp diagonals, pinball machines, magazines and men are of a piece here. Related: Made in Memphis: William Eggleston's surreal visions of the American south Continue reading... [...]
Fri, Sep 22, 2017
Source: The Guardian
The world's greatest living artist gets the blockbuster treatment he deserves, while four nominees for the coveted award exhibit their work in HullThe world's greatest living artist gets the blockbuster treatment he deserves. In 1954, Johns began painting an American flag in waxy layers over newspaper clippings. What was he saying about the US? Ever since, this enigmatic and highly intelligent artist has ploughed a furrow between art and life. Together with Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly, he has created the most subtle, profound art of the past 60 years. Royal Academy of Arts, W1, 23 September to 10 December Continue reading... [...]
Fri, Sep 22, 2017
Source: The Guardian
The often provocative work of the French sculptor is being celebrated in a new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and shines a light on some of her lesser-known print pieces that focus on issues of patriarchy, sexuality and womanhood. Continue reading... [...]
Fri, Sep 22, 2017
Source: The Guardian
Our daily round-up of news from the art world Thomas P. Campbell joins board of directors at LA's Broad | Thomas P. Campbell, former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and recent recipient of the Getty Museum and Rothschild Foundation fellowship, is one of four new board members at the Broad in Los Angeles, it was announced yesterday. Joining Campbell as new trustees of the contemporary art museum, which celebrates its two-year anniversary this week, are Deborah Kanter (chief legal counsel for the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation) and Joanne Heyler (founding director of the Broad museum), as well as former Paramount Pictures chief Sherry Lansing. These additions have doubled the size of the institution's board, whose founding members are Eli Broad, Robert Tuttle, Bruce Karatz and Jay Wintrob. Theaster Gates wins $100,000 Nasher Prize | The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas has awarded the 2018 edition of its sculpture prize to American artist Theaster Gates, it was announced this week. The $100,000 prize, now in its third year, is presented annually to a living artist whose work ‘elevate[s] the understanding of sculpture and its possibilities'; previous winners were Doris Salcedo and Pierre Huyghe. Gates will receive his Renzo Piano-designed award at a ceremony in Dallas on 7 April 2018. Read Jonathan Griffin's recent interview with the artist here. Massachusetts Cultural Council calls for Berkshire Museum to stop sale | The Massachusetts Cultural Council has added to the calls for the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield to cancel its planned sale of 40 works from the museum's collection, the local Berkshire Eagle newspaper reports. In a statement, the state agency argued that according to its own and two other independent analyses, the museum's financial circumstances are not as dire as it claims. The statement urges the institution ‘to reverse its decision to sell [...]
Thu, Sep 21, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
Introducing Rakewell, Apollo's wandering eye on the art world. Look out for regular posts taking a rakish perspective on art and museum stories. In Moscow, a new piece of public statuary is proving controversial. Towering some 30 feet above the city's Sadovaya Karetnaya Street, the sculpture of the late engineer Mikhail Kalashnikov cradling his eponymous assault rifle was erected by the Kremlin-backed Russian Military-Historical Society at a cost of 35 million roubles (around £450,000), and has rather divided opinion. ‘I cannot imagine a city in the world where a Homeric monument to an instrument of murder is erected', said one Russian quoted by the Times. The official reaction, however, has been rather more enthusiastic. Praising the statue, the Russian culture minister Vladimir Medinsky described the AK47 ‘Kalashnikov' rifle as ‘Russia's cultural brand' (which, whatever you think of the likeness, does rather undermine the contributions of Tarkovsky, Tolstoy, Shostakovich, Malevich et al.). A high-ranking member of the Orthodox Church, meanwhile, lauded it as ‘a holy weapon'. This is far from the first time the ubiquitous assault rifle has been, erm, immortalised in a monumental context. Its contribution to the socialist insurgency in Mozambique has earned it a permanent place on that country's flag. It has also popped up in numerous statues produced by North Korea's prolific Mansudae Art Studio. Closer to home, the Kalashnikov has also been a source of inspiration to our very own YBAs. In 2012, London's ICA staged a group exhibition entitled ‘AKA Peace', for which several high profile contemporary artists were approached to customise examples of the weapon into their own inimitable styles. Notable contributors included Damien Hirst, Sarah Lucas and Antony Gormley – although unlike the maker of Moscow's latest monument, they were disrupting a symbol of war, rather than whacking it on a gigantic pedestal… Got a story for Rakewell? [...]
Thu, Sep 21, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
Like the cars of rollercoasters, art and antiques fairs are either climbing upwards or plunging down. If they pause and rest on their laurels, the precipice awaits. Fortunately, the Biennale Internazionale dell'Antiquariato di Firenze (23 September–1 October) – now abbreviated to BIAF – is most definitely on the up. Its most recent edition, two years ago, saw the appointment of a new and outward-looking secretary general, Fabrizio Moretti, a dealer with galleries in Florence, London and Monaco, and business interests which extend from trecento gold-ground paintings to contemporary art. The fair – and Florence itself – is ringing the changes. The event has the huge advantage of offering exhibitors and visitors alike one of the most beautiful cities in the world and arguably the grandest of all fair venues. Nowhere rivals the 17th-century Palazzo Corsini, or the breathtaking view from its great terrace which overlooks the Arno and offers refreshments to visitors at the half-way point in their meander through the fair's 80 or so stands. The fair could be nowhere else but in Italy and, despite its growing internationalism, is still focused primarily on Italian or Italianate art. To mark the 30th edition, the Palazzo will be transformed by the Venetian interior and event designer Matteo Corvino. ‘It will be a cleaner, more modern design,' Moretti has said, ‘and Corvino is the right person to take over.' Perhaps less noticeable, but significant, is the extension of the timeline from 1979 to 1989, allowing for more contemporary exhibits. ‘This is a choice that reflects the trend we are seeing at all the major sector events around the world and which intends to favour a type of collecting that has shown a clear preference for mixing works of different eras. An Allegory of Love (c. 1520), Bernardino Licinio. Robilant + Voena (€750,000) Two years ago, [...]
Thu, Sep 21, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
Between 2014 and 2016 the documentary photographer Martin Parr turned his wry gaze to the University of Oxford. The resulting exhibition and book present a photographic portrait of the university today; laying bare its hidden stories and eccentricities. Speaking at the launch of ‘Martin Parr: Oxford' in the Bodleian Weston Library, the artist expanded on the contradiction at the heart of the city – the subject and motivation behind this exhibition: ‘Oxford is one of those places: the more you get to know the more you realise you don't know.' Gaining behind-the-scenes access to the university was no mean feat, each college and department came with its own set of individual permissions. Parr's photographs unveil the familiar pomp of age-old traditions, like the honorary degree ceremony at the Sheldonian Theatre, the annual May Day celebrations, and ‘trashings' in which students celebrate finishing their exams in a colourful frenzy. These scenes are set alongside somewhat less predictable, often hidden activities. Officers of the Pembroke College Junior Common Room Art Collection (2015), Martin Parr. © Martin Parr/Magnum Photos An interesting strand cutting through Parr's display is Oxford's thriving contemporary arts scene. At Pembroke College (where I am the curator of art), students have been collecting works of modern and contemporary British art since the 1940s. The artist captured the 2015 committee, poised in the College's modern art gallery. In-situ images of students from the Ruskin School of Art, drawing in a studio and discussing work in a tutorial, further develop this narrative. Beyond practical art, the subject of research and study is perhaps less photogenic, nonetheless Parr fairly represents a student-life that is preoccupied with work: backs hunched over MacBooks and paper books, technology developers, and scientists in labs all make a feature. One aspect of the university's social activity is seen in the extravagance of [...]
Thu, Sep 21, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
00:01:27© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved. [...]
Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art
00:01:39© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved. [...]
Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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