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Even his warmest admirers would hardly claim that Henry James's Italian Hours (1909), an anthology of distinctly fey travel sketches written over several decades, deserves to rank among his masterpieces. Be that as it may, its evocative title has been borrowed for an imaginative and at times revelatory multi-venue exhibition in the principal museums of Amiens (until 2 July), Beauvais (until 17 September), Chantilly (until 2 July), and Compiègne (until 21 August), all of which are an hour's train journey or less from Paris. The simple ambition of the show is to display a rich anthology of the best examples of Italian painting to be found in Picardy, with each of the four museums covering a century (or, in the case of Amiens, two). As an added bonus, 14 satellite exhibitions are running between March 2017 and March 2018 in the Hauts-de-France region (comprising Picardy and the Nord-Pas-de-Calais). There are 230 entries in the catalogue, which are complemented by an illustrated appendix containing a further 145 Italian paintings (from the regions of Aisne, Oise, and Somme) not in the show. The Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo (1652), Jusepe de Ribera. Musée de Picardie, Amiens Photo: © Thomas Clot; © C2RMF A fair few of the works on display are of course already well known, but many others are most definitely not, principally because they come from out-of-the-way museums or all-but-forgotten country churches. The prospect of the exhibition inspired the restoration of a number of paintings, and one of its most laudable ambitions has been to present them to both scholars and a wider public, regardless of whether their authorship has or has not been securely established. In consequence, the words attribué and entourage appear in various individual entries, while others settle for designations such as ‘Naples?' That said, the 36 authors of [...]
Sat, Jul 22, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
The traditional Muslim prayer rug becomes a way to explore the universal human need for security, as well as ideas of heritage, family and cultural identity, in an upcoming exhibition Sanctuary, to be presented by the San Francisco arts non-profit For-Site Sanctuary this autumn (7 October-11 March 2018). The show will feature 36 wool prayer rugs hand-made by master weavers in Lahore, Pakistan, from new designs by 36 artists from 22 countriesmany of which are predominantly Muslimincluding the Palestinian artist Emily Jacir, the Mexican artist Ana Teresa Fernndez and the US artist Hank Willis Thomas. The four-by-six feet rugs will be arranged across the floor of a former sacred space in San Francisco: a former interfaith chapel for military personnel at the Fort Mason Centre for Arts and Culture, located in a disused military facility that is now a national park. Visitors will be able to walk across and sit or lie on the rugs, after removing their shoes, as one would in a sacred space. This act is a way of making oneself more vulnerable to the ideasjust the very act of exposing that part of their body to experience the work, says Cheryl Haines, the executive director of For-Site. The show has been in the works for around a yearso before Trumps immigration ban from six Muslim-majority countriesbut has proved to be sadly on point in terms of current social issues, says Haines. The idea of sanctuary addresses the growing numbers of people who are shifting from one place to another in the world, looking for human rights, security and safety, Haines says. Sanctuary was inspired in part by the video work Disintegration (2012) by the France-born, Iran-based Yashar Azar Emdadian, included in For-Sites 2016 exhibition Home Land Security. The work shows the artist shaving [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
Our daily round-up of news from the art world Getty announces acquisition of 16 Old Master drawings | The J. Paul Getty Museum has announced that it has acquired 16 Old Master drawings and a painting by Watteau. The drawings include works by Michelangelo, Parmigianino, Rubens, Goya, and Degas. ‘[The exhibition] brings into our collection many of the finest drawings of the Renaissance through nineteenth century that have come to market over the past thirty years', said director Timothy Potts, who added that it was ‘unlikely' that another such opportunity would arise for some years. Stolen Francis Bacon paintings recovered | Spanish police have recovered three Francis Bacon paintings that were stolen in 2015. The works were taken from the Madrid home of Jose Capelo, the painter's former lover. A police statement says that the paintings were recovered after a tip off from the Art Loss Register. Two other Bacon works stolen at the same time have yet to be recovered. Nicole Eisenman sculpture vandalised in Münster | A sculpture installation by Nicole Eisenman was severely vandalised this week in Münster, where it was on show as part of the city's Sculpture Project, which takes place every 10 years. According to officials, one of the group of reclining figures that constitute the installation was decapitated, and the perpetrator is believed to have escaped with the head. Breese Little gallery to close | The Breese Little gallery in east London has announced that it will close at the end of July. Established in 2010, the gallery has staged an ambitious and impressive programme of events and exhibitions, culminating in its current show, the critically praised ‘31 Women'. Recommended reading | In Artnews, Alex Greenberger reviews Carol Rama's exhibition at the New Museum, describing it as a show of ‘many, many great works' that explore ‘unspeakable desires [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
Paula Pape, daughter of the Brazilian artist Lygia Pape, has filed a suit in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York against LG Electronics, several vendors of its mobile phones and Getty Images Korea alleging an infringement of copyright of one of the late artists works. Visitors to Papes exhibition A Multitude of Forms at Met Breuer (through 23 July) might recognize Ttia (2003), a delicate linear installation of golden threads that bisect in a dark room. The plaintiff charges that the Seoul-based electronics giant is using a too-similar riff on Papes work as a cell phone wallpaper for its K20 V mobile phone, widely promoted by such outlets as Metro PCS, Verizon Wireless and Cricket. LG, the complaint says, had previously sought to license an image of Ttia from the Projeto Lygia Pape, the artists estate administered by her daughter. After denying LGs repeated requests (via Getty Images, also named as a defendant), the plaintiff says the company ignored the advice of its copyright agent and proceeded to create an unauthorized derivation of Papes work that it then sought permission to use instead. The Projeto Lygia Pape refused unequivocally, noting that a license would not be granted under any circumstances as the artist had refused to engage in commercial transactions around her art for much of her life. LG used a similar image anyway, the complaint says. Pape is seeking a jury trial to award damages, plus a permanent injunction against LG prohibiting further shipment or sales of the device or promotional materials, and is demanding that the company reveal the identity of the images creator and destroy all unauthorized derivations. Because the image is the default wallpaper in the phones software and is featured on the box it comes in, Ms. [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
Introducing Rakewell, Apollo's wandering eye on the art world. Look out for regular posts taking a rakish perspective on art and museum stories. Emmanuel Macron shot to the French presidency this year promising a break with the past – which extends to a change in the format of the official presidential portrait, it turns out. A photograph of the head of state has traditionally been issued to adorn the walls of town halls across the land, and has conformed to the standard dimensions of 50 x 65cm ever since Charles De Gaulle took the helm of the 5th Republic in 1959. Too big Mac But Macron's portrait has broken with tradition, measuring 5cm taller than previous presidential mugshots. Local officials – who have been ordered to make significant savings over the next five years – are in a huff over the new format, with some complaining that it will require them to buy new frames in order to display the image. Romain Senoble, the mayor of Forges, has estimated that replacing the frames will cost the 36,000 communes of France a collective €2.7m – but did suggest a solution, proposing to ‘get out the scissors and remove the excess centimetres'. The portrait, shot by Macron's campaign photographer Soazig de La Moissonnière, depicts the youthful president leaning against his desk in the Elysée against a backdrop of the Tricolore and the EU flag. Some were quick to ridicule the photograph, point out that the digital metadata for the hi-res version betrayed the fact it had been subject to extensive retouching.Dans les métadonnées du portrait officiel d'Emmanuel Macron, trois jours de petites modifs sur Photoshop. #PortraitOfficiel pic.twitter.com/WPhxH1IhSs — Silvère Boucher-L. (@silverebl) June 29, 2017Twitter, meanwhile, had great fun playing around with the president's pose:French President Emmanuel Macron's official portrait mocked with memes https://t.co/ywHJBNfc85 pic.twitter.com/BkBI987JD9 — Dan Lopez (@4danlopez) [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
Salvador Dals famous twirling moustache is in a good condition, says the embalmer who tended the Surrealists body after his death in 1989. The artists most recognisable facial feature remains unblemished, says Narcs Bardalet who assisted with the exhumation of Dals corpse yesterday at the Dal Theatre-Museum in Figueres (20 July). His moustache is still intact [set at] ten past ten, just as he liked it, its a miracle, Bardalet told the Catalan radio station RAC1. Last month, a Spanish court ordered that Dals body be exhumed to determine whether he is the biological father of Mara Pilar Abel Martnez. According to the Spanish newspaper El Pas, Abel has been fighting to be acknowledged as Dals daughter since 2007. Abel claims that her mother had an affair with the artist in 1955 in Port-Lligat, a small coastal village in northern Catalonia where Dal lived and worked. Abel was born the following year in February 1956 (Dal was married to Gala at the time; the couple never had any children). If Abel is the daughter of Dal, she could make a claim towards the artists estate, which was left to the Spanish state following his death in 1989. The DNA results are expected in the next two months. [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
Is there such thing as a feminine – that is, exclusively female – aesthetic? This is the question posed by German writer Silvia Bovenschen in her aptly titled 1976 essay ‘Is There a Feminine Aesthetic?', which explores the history of western culture's attempts to exclude, assimilate and differentiate art made by women. Bovenschen posits that what we might refer to as ‘traditional' women's arts – cooking, pottery, cosmetics, conversation – ought to be located within a ‘pre-aesthetic' realm of functional domesticity where women's creative energies were shunted off, rendered inferior by their inability to ‘break loose and initiate communication' with the wider world. She asks: ‘what would happen if someday we cleared out this realm and opened it…What if we alternated painting our faces with painting on canvas? What if we turned recipes into poetry?' What if we gave women the freedom publicly to discover and communicate their own voices as artists? Emma Hart, ‘Mamma Mia', installation view, Whitechapel Gallery. Photo: Thierry Bal Established nearly three decades later in 2005, the Max Mara Art Prize for Women conducts a practical investigation into a similar question, asking what the recipients of its award might be capable of, enabled to ‘develop their potential with the gift of time and space'. The winner of the biannual art prize is given a six-month residency in Italy in order to realise a new project, which is then presented in a solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery in London (and touring to the Collezione Maramotti in Reggio Emilia, Italy). For British artist Emma Hart, winner of the prize's sixth edition, the gift of time and space seems to have proven invaluable. Hart's installation ‘Mamma Mia!', which recently opened at the Whitechapel, combines meticulous craft and extensive research with an instinctive understanding of atmosphere. The installation is staged in a single [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: Apollo Magazine
Sophie Macpherson Ltd are running various searches for a client based in India which include: Commercial Director Operations Director Gallery Director Creative Director Outreach Director Archivist All positions are posted on our website: www.sophiemacpherson.com/opportunities If you are interested, please send your CV to Hattie Culshaw at hattie@sophiemacpherson.com [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: The Art Newspaper
The Frieze fair flings open the doors of its outdoor sculpture garden, Pablo Bronstein's striking new sculpture is unveiled in Edinburgh and a show devoted to comics opens in Derby – in your weekly dispatchPablo BronsteinA gothic folly is connected with a Chinoiserie pavilion by a narrow rose walk in Bronstein's new permanent commission for Scotland's superb sculpture park.• Jupiter Artland, Edinburgh, opening 27 July. Continue reading... [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: The Guardian
The German artist's 2001 painting is a dystopian nightmare – but also a scene that could have been pulled from coverage of the current refugee crisisDaniel Richter's Tarifa is both a dystopian nightmare and a scene that could have been pulled straight from recent front-page news. Women in headscarves and men, all hunkered low on an orange dinghy barely large enough to bear their weight, recall countless images of the ongoing refugee crisis. Continue reading... [...]
Fri, Jul 21, 2017
Source: The Guardian

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